COTTON

Controlling Tarnished Plant Bug - An Extension Agent's Perspective
Presented by Ray Benson
County Cooperative Extension Agent,- Staff Chair, Mississippi County, AR
Tarnished plant bug (TPB) has become the major insect pest in northeast Arkansas cotton. University of Arkansas research has indicated that TPB treatment can be terminated at 250 heat units after cutout. Producers in our area treat most fields multiple times for TPB, many of these treatments are made after TPB treatment should be terminated. Thresholds and termination of treatment of TPB from an extension agentŐs perspective will be discussed

Nectariless Cotton- A Tool For Reducing Tarnished Plant Bug Populations
Presented by Dr. Fred Bourland
County Cooperative Extension Agent - Staff Chair, Mississippi County, AR
Nectaries on cotton, which are located on each leaf and fruit form, attract certain insects- particularly tarnished plant bugs. Nectariless cottons were successful in the 1980's, but their impact on TPB was not realized due to treating boll weevils and worms. After much effort, a new nectariless cotton variety has been released by the University of Arkansas. This line should assist with TPB control, and should be exempt from suggested treatment restrictions on flowering cotton associated with bee populations.

Management Of Cotton Bollworm In Bt Cotton
Presented by Angus Catchot
Extension Entomologist, Mississippi State University
Over the last several years producers in the Mid-South region have faced numerous challenges managing bollworms in Bt cottons. This presentation will address experiences with bollworm management in BG2 cotton and offer possible explanations for the changes, management strategies, and solutions for 2019.

Sustainability Goals And Market Pulls
Presented by Jesse Daystar
Chief Sustainability Officer, Cotton Incorporated
It is clear that society's focus on sustainability is here to stay. Many brands are responding to this and leading the way by making science based targets on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other impacts. These goals are publically released and hold brands and their supply chains accountable for reducing their environmental impacts. Both cotton and rice are important materials in supply chains and will pushed to make GHG reductions as well. This presentation will cover the US cotton industry sustainability goals and the sustainability programs being developed by the cotton Sustainability Task force

Digital Farming - A Year Round Tool For Cotton
Presented by Fran Deville
Climate Business Manager, Deltapine
Digital tools in cotton, from planting through harvest, now allow farmers to simply gather greater insights into their farming operation. Capture, visualize and organize your operational data in order to analyze and gain deeper insights for more informed current and future decisions.

Nitrogen Rates For Louisiana Cotton
Presented by Dr. Daniel Fromme
Associate Professor, State Corn Grain Sorghum & Cotton Specialist, LSU Ag Center
Caution should be used to not apply more nitrogen than what is going to be required by the cotton plant, since excessively high nitrogen rates can produce very tall and rank cotton. This increased vegetative growth will hinder reproductive growth and ultimately yield. Furthermore, to limit this excessive growth, producers will have to rely heavily on mepiquat chloride applications to control plant height and creating the potential for making the cotton plant harder to defoliate at the end of season.
Based on recent studies, recommended nitrogen rates are 60-90 pounds per acre for course textured soils and 90-120 pounds per acre for high clay soils. The lower recommended rates should be used on fields that are following soybeans, corn, legume cover crops, or fields with a history of excessive stalk growth. In 2017, significant yield reductions were found when excessive nitrogen rates were applied.

Adjusting The Production System To Fit Modern Cultivars
Presented by Bob Griffin
Arkansas Farmer: Cotton
Cotton cultivars are changing rapidly. In response, several management decisions must also change. There are four main aspects of the current agronomic system that require attention as we move into more vigorous, more adaptable cultivars. First, reduced seeding rates may be necessary to reduce interplant competition. Second, we have been applying 100 to 120 lb N per acre; performance appears to be optimized around 80-90 lb N/ac. Third, excessive soil moisture, particularly in the irrigated system, may be limiting yields. Finally, plant growth regulator use will likely need to move earlier in the season and be applied at higher rates. Making the aforementioned adjustments to the production system has the potential to maintain or increase our yields while reducing variable expenses.

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Presented by Richard Griffing
Louisiana Consultant, Griffing Consulting
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Presented by George LaCour Jr.
Louisiana Farmer: Cotton, Soybeans, Corn, Wheat, Sugarcane
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Louisiana Cotton Sustainability Pilot-Project Update And On-Farm Case Study
Presented by Rachel Lee
Soil Health Research and Implementation Manager, NRCS/Cotton Industry
Presented by Kellon Lee
Louisiana Farmer: Cotton
The Field Print Platform (FPP) was developed by the Field to Market Coalition for Sustainable Agriculture for cotton, rice, soybeans, corn, wheat, potatoes and alfalfa farmers. The FPP is used in a multiyear Louisiana study to assess management practices and natural resource conservation. Rachel Lee will discuss results of a pilot project conducted in collaboration with the Louisiana NRCS and cotton industry. Land use, energy, water, greenhouse gas, soil carbon, runoff water quality, irrigation, and soil loss data on more than 45 fields in 2017 and 2018 will be shared. The project included fields of diverse production practices, a variety of soils and varying inputs and provides understandings into how the tool can be used by farmers to assess their own fields' performance. Rachel will describe how, at a farmers' discretion, the results can be aggregated with those of other cotton farmers and shared with the supply chain to meet the increasing need for transparent evidence of responsible production practices. Kellon Lee will provide a farmer's viewpoint on practical aspects of using the tools and implementing best management practices. Kellon will provide farmer's insights of the intersect of natural resource concerns and profitability objectives.

Challenges Facing The Cotton Industry From A Consultants' Perspective
Presented by Tucker Miller III
Mississippi Consultant, Miller Entomological Services Inc.
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Adjusting The Production System To Fit Modern Cultivars: Maximizing Efficiency
Presented by Dr. Tyson B. Raper
Pettigrew Cotton Specialist, University of Tennessee
Cotton cultivars are changing rapidly. In response, several management decisions must also change. There are four main aspects of the current agronomic system that require attention as we move into more vigorous, more adaptable cultivars. First, reduced seeding rates may be necessary to reduce interplant competition. Second, we have been applying 100 to 120 lb N per acre' performance appears to be optimized around 80-90 lb N/ac. Third, excessive soil moisture, particularly in the irrigated system, may be limiting yields. Finally, plant growth regulator use will likely need to move earlier in the season and be applied at higher rates. Making the aforementioned adjustments to the production system has the potential to maintain or increase our yields while reducing variable expenses.

Water Infiltration As Influenced By Cover Crop Termination
Presented by Bill Robertson
Professor, Cotton Extension Agronomist, University of Arkansas System, Division of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service
Most of the recommendations regarding cover crop termination is focused on above-ground biomass production and the relationship between termination timing and planting date to prevent the cover crop from serving as a green bridge for pests. We will discuss how cereal rye termination from early-boot to anthesis impacts depth and concentration of rooting at planting and how the below-ground cover crop development impacts water infiltration at 6, 12, and 18 inch depths.

Growers And Researchers Team Up To Tackle Emerging Disease Threats
Presented by Jodi A. Scheffler
Research Geneticist, USDA ARS
Controlling cotton diseases is a continual battle for growers. They are trying to control diseases already established while on the lookout for emerging threats. Success depends on a team effort with growers and crop consultants on the front lines identifying new diseases in their own fields. The other part of the team includes breeders and pathologists that are proactively developing cotton lines with resistance to potential disease threats by cooperating with researchers in countries where a disease is already established. This allows a quicker response with diagnostic tests and resistant cotton already available and ready to be deployed.

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: A Farmers View
Presented by Ted Schneider
Louisiana Farmer: Cotton, Corn, Soybeans
Data requests, regulations, and increasing focus on sustainability is becoming an issue for farmers. With brands and retailers driving sustainability, often times what they consider to be sustainable is not possible or is impractical for growers. To avoid future situations where brands are telling growers how to farm, farmers need to lead in the sustainability conversation with ideas of their own to drive sustainability agendas that work for growers while decreasing impacts on the environment. Schneider will discuss how growers can engage in sustainability assessments, programs, and organizations to take a more active role in defining what more sustainable agriculture looks like to farmers. He is a third generation farmer, primarily growing cotton, corn, and soybeans but, sometimes rice, grain sorghum and wheat as well on about 3,600 acres. He has a business degree from LSU and has been farming for 34 years.

Strategies To Improve Water Efficiency With Cover Crops
Presented by Steve Stevens
Arkansas Farmer: Cotton
We have partnered with the University of Arkansas System Division of Ag through the Cotton Research Verification and Sustainability Program and the Arkansas Discovery Farms for several years. We have evaluated several practices that have resulted in improved water efficiency and soil health. We will discuss how these practices have improved the health of my soils, how this impacts irrigation, and my goal to leave the farm in better shape than when I started.